New research identifies ‘time of emergence’ of climate change impacts in Puget Sound

When can we expect to see the full impacts of climate change in Puget Sound, and what will those be? UW Climate Impacts Group Director Amy Snover will present new research in a talk tomorrow (November 19th) at the University of Washington Tacoma. Her presentation is from 2-3:30 at the UWT Research Commons, 3rd Floor Tioga Library Building (TLB) 1907 Jefferson Ave, Tacoma.

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PSI is hiring a research scientist

The Puget Sound Insti­tute is seek­ing a highly-motivated full-time research sci­en­tist to ana­lyze and syn­the­size, and help design a com­mu­ni­ca­tion plan for, the results of 30–35 research projects con­ducted over the last 4 years focused on recov­ery and pro­tec­tion of the nearshore and marine envi­ron­ments of Puget Sound. This is an 8-month project, and we are seek­ing a PhD-level indi­vid­ual with a back­ground in aquatic ecol­ogy, and con­nect­ing sci­ence to pol­icy; famil­iar­ity with the Puget Sound region is a plus. This is a real oppor­tu­nity to con­nect results from funded research to pol­icy, or imple­men­ta­tion activ­i­ties, in sup­port of ecosys­tem recovery. Continue reading

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Brighter future for salmon at downtown seawall

Juvenile salmon at the Seattle Aquarium. Photo: kamikaze.spoon https://www.flickr.com/photos/kamikazespoon/264239056

Juvenile salmon at the Seattle Aquarium. Photo: kamikaze.spoon https://www.flickr.com/photos/kamikazespoon/264239056

The decaying seawall along Seattle’s waterfront is providing scientists with an opportunity to improve long-lost habitat for migrating salmon. It could also show the way for habitat enhancements to crumbling infrastructure worldwide. One University of Washington researcher describes the project.

Read more about the Seattle seawall in Salish Sea Currents.

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Forum looks at risks to Cherry Point

Announcement reprinted from Resources for Sustainable Communities

Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve Forum: A Report to the Community

Saturday, October 25th
9:30am – 3:00 0pm
Bellingham Technical College (map)
Building G, Room 102A/103B

Attend this Forum to learn about the risks posed to the Salish Sea by projected increases in vessel and rail transportation, and learn about Cherry Point herring and their role in the ecosystem. Sessions include experts speaking on Vessel and Railway Risk Assessment, Cherry Point as an Aquatic Reserve, and Forage Fish and Cherry Point herring. The forum is sponsored by the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve Citizen Stewardship Committee. Learn more about the committee here.

PSI’s Tessa Francis will deliver the talk on Cherry Point’s herring population. Click here to read about the full group of presenters. View information about other talks and forums in the series. 
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Science Panel: Are Puget Sound recovery efforts working?

The Puget Sound Science Panel will discuss the state of effectiveness monitoring in Puget Sound at its October 16th meeting in Edmonds. Also on the agenda are updates to new biophysical and human wellbeing indicators of Puget Sound health.

The meeting will be held from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM at the Center Conference Room
at the Edmonds Center for the Arts. The meeting is immediately followed by the science panel’s speaker series from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. Edmonds Community College. Puget Sound Institute Director Joel Baker will give a talk about the global impacts of microplastics. He will be followed by NOAA Fisheries Science and Research Director John Stein, who will looks at some of the ways that science informs fisheries policy.

Download the meeting agenda and related documents.

 

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Citizens now the leading cause of toxics in Puget Sound

Stormwater flowing into catch basin carries contaminants to our waterways. Photo: Ben McLeod (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Stormwater flowing into catch basin carries contaminants to our waterways. Photo: Ben McLeod (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The latest issue of Salish Sea Currents reports that some of the greatest dangers to Puget Sound come from our common, everyday activities. These pervasive sources of pollution are so woven into our lives that they are almost invisible to us, but it’s becoming impossible to ignore their effects.

Read the article in the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound.

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No salmon left behind: The importance of early growth and freshwater restoration

Nisqually Reserve Fish Sampling March 2012. Photo: Michael Grilliot, DNR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Nisqually Reserve Fish Sampling March 2012. Photo: Michael Grilliot, DNR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Traditionally, salmon restoration has focused heavily on spawning habitat in streams and rivers, but scientists say that may no longer be enough. New research presented at the 2014 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference suggests that conserving and increasing high-quality habitat for juvenile salmon could be just as vital. Read the article by Emily Davis in the Salish Sea Currents series. 

 

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Leadership Council to vote on science priorities Sept. 11-12 in Seattle

The Puget Sound Partnership’s Leadership Council meets on September 11th and 12th to vote on current science priorities for Puget Sound recovery. Items under consideration include the 2014-2016 Biennial Science Work Plan, prepared by the Puget Sound Institute’s Nick Georgiadis in cooperation with the Puget Sound Partnership and the Puget Sound Science Panel. The plan identifies potential focus areas for scientific research that may guide regional recovery efforts. The council will also vote on new funding measures and the addition of several “Near Term Actions” outlining goals and priorities for the Puget Sound Partnership.

The meeting will be held at the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce. Read the full agenda at: www.psp.wa.gov/LC_meetings.php.

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