PSP appoints three new Science Panel members

The Puget Sound Partnership has appointed three new members to its advisory Science Panel.

The new panel members include Barbara Bentley, a former academic and now President and CEO of Noetica Naturalists; Robert Ewing, Director of Timberlands Strategic Planning for Weyerhaeuser; and Eric Strecker, Principal Water Resources Engineer and Fisheries Biologist with Geosyntec Consultants.

Four current members of the Science Panel were re-appointed, including Wayne Landis, Timothy Quinn, John Stark and Trina Wellman.

View the press release from the Puget Sound Partnership.

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The ecosystem is delicious

Olympia oysters. Photo: VIUDeepBay (CC BY 2.0) https://www.flickr.com/photos/viucsr/5778358466

Olympia oysters. Photo: VIUDeepBay (CC BY 2.0) https://www.flickr.com/photos/viucsr/5778358466

The shellfish industry is a cornerstone of the Puget Sound economy, but the region’s famed mollusks provide more than just money and jobs. They offer what are called ecosystem services—a wide variety of benefits that humans derive from an ecosystem.

Read Eric Wagner’s story in today’s Salish Sea Currents.

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Scientists examine the ‘time of emergence’ for climate change in Puget Sound

Mean sea level trend in Seattle, WA (1898-2006). A rising sevel trend of 2.06 mm/yr (0.68 feet per100 years) was observed at a station in the Seattle, WA area. (NOAA. 2012).

Mean sea level trend in Seattle, WA (1898-2006). A rising sevel trend of 2.06 mm/yr (0.68 feet per100 years) was observed at a station in the Seattle, WA area. (NOAA. 2012).

Climate change, like politics, is local. “At least that is how you have to look at the impacts,” says Encyclopedia of Puget Sound topic editor Amy Snover. Snover is the Director of the Climate Impacts Group at the University of Washington and has been conducting research on the expected ‘time of emergence’ for climate change in the Puget Sound region.

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Nature inspires new approach to flood control

Aerial photo of Hansen Creek restoration site in Skagit County, WA. October 15, 2010. Photo: Kari Neumeyer/NWIFC

Aerial photo of Hansen Creek restoration site in Skagit County, WA. October 15, 2010. Photo: Kari Neumeyer/NWIFC

Every year, winter rains bring the threat of millions of dollars in property damage, or even the loss of life, from floods. Rivers have historically been channeled and tamed to protect towns and farms in low-lying floodplains, but research shows that this approach may actually be making flooding worse while at the same time threatening Puget Sound’s salmon. At Hansen Creek in the Skagit Valley, scientists say nature is the best engineer. Read Eric Wagner’s story in the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound’s Salish Sea Currents series. 

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New research identifies ‘time of emergence’ of climate change impacts in Puget Sound

When can we expect to see the full impacts of climate change in Puget Sound, and what will those be? UW Climate Impacts Group Director Amy Snover will present new research in a talk tomorrow (November 19th) at the University of Washington Tacoma. Her presentation is from 2-3:30 at the UWT Research Commons, 3rd Floor Tioga Library Building (TLB) 1907 Jefferson Ave, Tacoma.

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PSI is hiring a research scientist

The Puget Sound Insti­tute is seek­ing a highly-motivated full-time research sci­en­tist to ana­lyze and syn­the­size, and help design a com­mu­ni­ca­tion plan for, the results of 30–35 research projects con­ducted over the last 4 years focused on recov­ery and pro­tec­tion of the nearshore and marine envi­ron­ments of Puget Sound. This is an 8-month project, and we are seek­ing a PhD-level indi­vid­ual with a back­ground in aquatic ecol­ogy, and con­nect­ing sci­ence to pol­icy; famil­iar­ity with the Puget Sound region is a plus. This is a real oppor­tu­nity to con­nect results from funded research to pol­icy, or imple­men­ta­tion activ­i­ties, in sup­port of ecosys­tem recovery. Continue reading

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Brighter future for salmon at downtown seawall

Juvenile salmon at the Seattle Aquarium. Photo: kamikaze.spoon https://www.flickr.com/photos/kamikazespoon/264239056

Juvenile salmon at the Seattle Aquarium. Photo: kamikaze.spoon https://www.flickr.com/photos/kamikazespoon/264239056

The decaying seawall along Seattle’s waterfront is providing scientists with an opportunity to improve long-lost habitat for migrating salmon. It could also show the way for habitat enhancements to crumbling infrastructure worldwide. One University of Washington researcher describes the project.

Read more about the Seattle seawall in Salish Sea Currents.

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Forum looks at risks to Cherry Point

Announcement reprinted from Resources for Sustainable Communities

Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve Forum: A Report to the Community

Saturday, October 25th
9:30am – 3:00 0pm
Bellingham Technical College (map)
Building G, Room 102A/103B

Attend this Forum to learn about the risks posed to the Salish Sea by projected increases in vessel and rail transportation, and learn about Cherry Point herring and their role in the ecosystem. Sessions include experts speaking on Vessel and Railway Risk Assessment, Cherry Point as an Aquatic Reserve, and Forage Fish and Cherry Point herring. The forum is sponsored by the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve Citizen Stewardship Committee. Learn more about the committee here.

PSI’s Tessa Francis will deliver the talk on Cherry Point’s herring population. Click here to read about the full group of presenters. View information about other talks and forums in the series. 
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Science Panel: Are Puget Sound recovery efforts working?

The Puget Sound Science Panel will discuss the state of effectiveness monitoring in Puget Sound at its October 16th meeting in Edmonds. Also on the agenda are updates to new biophysical and human wellbeing indicators of Puget Sound health.

The meeting will be held from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM at the Center Conference Room
at the Edmonds Center for the Arts. The meeting is immediately followed by the science panel’s speaker series from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. Edmonds Community College. Puget Sound Institute Director Joel Baker will give a talk about the global impacts of microplastics. He will be followed by NOAA Fisheries Science and Research Director John Stein, who will looks at some of the ways that science informs fisheries policy.

Download the meeting agenda and related documents.

 

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